Mormon Centered Thought

#BecauseofHim

mormonchannel:

Did you know? #LDSconf is among the top trends on Twitter in the U.S. during general conference.Join us tomorrow on our page to hear from the prophet and apostles at 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. MDT. Also available on our mobile app and YouTube and Roku channels.

mormonchannel:

Did you know? #LDSconf is among the top trends on Twitter in the U.S. during general conference.

Join us tomorrow on our page to hear from the prophet and apostles at 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. MDT. Also available on our mobile app and YouTube and Roku channels.

(via companion-cube-76)

We need to be civil in our discourse and respectful in our interactions. We live in a world where there is much turmoil. Many people are both angry and afraid. The Savior taught us to love even our enemies. This is especially true when we disagree. The moral basis of civility is the Golden Rule. It is taught in most religions and particularly by the Savior. “And as ye would that men should do to you, do ye also to them likewise.” Our faith requires that we treat our neighbors with respect.

Quinten L. Cook

[U]nless the guarantee of free exercise of religion gives a religious actor greater protection against government prohibitions than are already guaranteed to all actors by other provisions of the constitution (like freedom of speech), what is the special value of religious freedom? Surely the First Amendment guarantee of free exercise of religion was intended to grant more freedom to religious action than to other kinds of action. Treating actions based on religious belief the same as actions based on other systems of belief should not be enough to satisfy the special place of religion in the United States Constitution.

Elder Dallin H. Oaks, Speech on Religious Freedom given at BYU-Idaho on October 13, 2009 (http://www.mormonnewsroom.org/article/apostle-says-religious-freedom-is-being-threatened

Prayer is a type of thought. It’s a lot like meditation — a type of very concentrated mental focus with passionate emotion directed towards a concept or situation, or the lack thereof. But there’s a special X-factor ingredient that makes “prayer” different than meditation or other types of thought. That X-factor is humility. This is the most seemingly contradictory aspect of prayer and what many people dislike about the feeling of praying. “Getting down on your knees” is not about lowering your power or being a weakling, it’s about showing respect for the size and grandeur of what we call existence — it’s about being humble in the presence of the vastness of life, space, and sensation, and acknowledging our extremely limited understanding of what it all really means.
When we seek to discover the best in others, we somehow bring out the best in ourselves.

William Arthur Ward

Learning at Church: 10 Principles Every Teacher Should Know

  1. Counsel with parents, who have the primary role as teachers, to identify needs of class members, and then teach to those needs.
  2. Prepare and teach by the Spirit. Identify questions and learning activities that will provide Spirit-led discussions and nurture class members spiritually.
  3. Teach people, not lessons.
  4. Focus on the core doctrines of the gospel.
  5. Teach one or two key principles in depth rather than trying to cover all the lesson material.
  6. Invite the Spirit by letting everyone participate (see D&C 88:122).
  7. Include a powerful invitation to act—not just something to go home and read but something to go home and live.
  8. Bear your testimony about the doctrine—at the end of the class and whenever the Spirit prompts you.
  9. Live the gospel, and “set in order” your own home (see D&C 93:43–44, 50).
  10. Find ways to let the teaching continue through informal moments in everyday life.